Practice Paper #39 – Back-to-basics n°3 – standard operations

 

1 – listening comprehension warming-up exercise

Listen to this audio file and jot down as many elements as you can. There are 9 messages and one ATIS, as in the FCL.055 exam. Each message is played twice, with a short pause between each repetition and a 10-second pause between two messages. Unlike in this instance, the actual FCL.055 exam uses a fill-in-the-blanks format.

 

2 – FCL.055-type fictional flight

Look at this exercise as you would a FCL.055 fictional flight: play the pilot’s part in this scenario:

F-BASF is a DR400 from Luxembourg to Tempelhof

The script and audio file contain only the ATC messages, with enough blanks, in the text as in the recording, for the pilot’s messages and readbacks.

 

3 – listening comprehension

Listen to this audio file and find the missing words in the text:

 

North Las Vegas airport

 

4 – the general English section

 

In the US, the symbol of the Republican Party is an elephant, while the Democrats favor a donkey. Read some excerpts from a CNN article explaining the origin of these strange mascots, then answer the following questions:

–  Who popularized the symbols?

– Where did he work?

– Which word is said to be derived from his name?

– In which year was the elephant popularized as a symbol for the Republican Party?

– To what is Nast comparing American politics?

 

The full article is available here.

 

5 – the Fun Corner

Review the origin of Eliot’s Practice Papers and go for a treasure hunt among the first of them with this October 2018 Infopilote article entitled:

Double the pleasure, find the treasure, with Eliot’s Practice Papers.

 

Find more exercises on standard operations in Practice Papers #31 to #36 (Shelter-In-Place Special Editions n°1 to n°6)

and in the November issue of Infopilote.

 

1 – listening comprehension warming-up exercise

full script

2 – FCL.055-type fictional flight

full script

full recording:

3 – listening comprehension

solution

4 – the general English section

Thomas Nast, Harper’s weekly, nasty, 1874, Barnum and Bailey.